Jeremy Narby

"This is perhaps one of the most important things I learned during this investigation: We see what we believe, and not just the contrary; and to change what we see, it is sometimes necessary to change what we believe."


"Nonetheless, gazing out the train window at a random sample of the Western world, I could not avoid noticing a kind of separation between human beings and all other species. We cut ourselves off by living in cement blocks, moving around in glass-and-metal bubbles, and spending a good part of our time watching other human beings on television. Outside, the pale light of an April sun was shining down on a suburb. I opened a newspaper and all I could find were pictures of human beings and articles about their activities. There was not a single article about another species."


"The rational approach start from the idea that everything is explainable and that mystery is in some sense the enemy. This means that it prefers pejorative, and even wrong, answers to admitting its own lack of understanding."


"An indigenous culture with sufficient territory, and bilingual and intercultural education, is in a better position to maintain and cultivate its mythology and shamanism. Conversely, the confiscation of their lands and imposition of foreign education, which turns their young people into amnesiacs, threatens the survival not only of these people, but of an entire way of knowing. It is as if one were burning down the oldest universities in the world and their libraries, one after another — thereby sacrificing the knowledge of the world's future generations."

Ayahuasca, Tobacco & Plant Teachers with Jeremy Narby

In this episode, Alex & Allyson interview world-renowned anthropologist Jeremy Narby about his recent book Plant Teachers: Ayahuasca, Tobacco & the Pursuit of Knowledge, co-authored with Amazonian shaman Rafael Chanchari Pizuri. You may know Jeremy as the author of the groundbreaking book The Cosmic Serpent, which explores shamanism and the origins of indigenous knowledge. Jeremy became an early pioneer of ayahuasca research while living with the Ashanica people of the Peruvian Amazon in the 1980s. He studied anthropology at Stanford University and now lives in Switzerland, working as the Amazonian Projects Director for Nouvelle Planete, a non-profit organization that promotes the economic and cultural empowerment of indigenous peoples.

Intelligence in Nature | Bioneers

In this mesmerizing talk, Jeremy Narby shares the findings from his groundbreaking book Intelligence in Nature. He describes his quest around the globe to chronicle how leading-edge scientists are studying intelligence in nature and how nature learns. He uncovers a universal thread of highly intelligent behavior within the natural world, and asks the question: What can humanity learn from nature's economy and knowingness? Weaving together issues of animal cognition, evolutionary biology and psychology, he challenges contemporary scientific concepts and reveals a much deeper view of the nature of intelligence and of our kinship with all life.

This presentation took place at the 2005 National Bioneers Conference and is part of the Ecological Design, Vol. 1 and Nature, Culture and Spirit, Vol. 1 Collections.

Since 1990, Bioneers has acted as a fertile hub of social and scientific innovators with practical and visionary solutions for the world's most pressing environmental and social challenges.

To experience talks like this, please join us at the Bioneers National Conference each October, and regional Bioneers Resilient Community Network gatherings held nationwide throughout the year.

Websites:
https://greatmystery.org/jeremynarby/
http://www.bioneers.org

Book:
https://amzn.to/3v3BzGf