In Google We Trust

"There is, simply, no way, to ignore privacy. Because a citizenry’s freedoms are interdependent, to surrender your own privacy is really to surrender everyone’s. You might choose to give it up out of convenience, or under the popular pretext that privacy is only required by those who have something to hide. But saying that you don’t need or want privacy because you have nothing to hide is to assume that no one should have, or could have to hide anything – including their immigration status, unemployment history, financial history, and health records. You’re assuming that no one, including yourself, might object to revealing to anyone information about their religious beliefs, political affiliations and sexual activities, as casually as some choose to reveal their movie and music tastes and reading preferences. Ultimately, saying that you don’t care about privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different from saying you don’t care about freedom of speech because you have nothing to say. Or that you don’t care about freedom of the press because you don’t like to read. Or that you don’t care about freedom of religion because you don’t believe in God. Or that you don’t care about the freedom to peaceably assemble because you’re a lazy, antisocial agoraphobe. Just because this or that freedom might not have meaning to you today doesn’t mean that that it doesn’t or won’t have meaning tomorrow, to you, or to your neighbor – or to the crowds of principled dissidents I was following on my phone who were protesting halfway across the planet, hoping to gain just a fraction of the freedom that my country was busily dismantling." - Edward Snowden

In Google We Trust

In Google We Trust Every hour of every day, our digital interactions are being recorded and logged. We live in the age of “big data,” where seemingly mundane information about how we go about our lives has enormous value. With the help of expert data trackers, we follow the information trail of an ordinary family. We follow their data over a typical day, watching as it is surreptitiously recorded by government agencies and private organizations. Who gathers the information, what are they doing with it and what are your legal rights? The internet has brought us conveniences once unimaginable. You can shop online, diagnose illnesses, and send “selfies” whenever you want. But it isn't all one-way traffic. Every time you use a search engine like Google, or access an “app” on your smartphone, your activity is logged by companies around the world — many you've never even heard of. That sometimes intensely personal data is either used or sold to make money. Our investigation reveals that not only are we being tracked online by marketers but government agencies are secretly monitoring our digital travels.