Albert Bartlett - Arithmetic, Population and Energy

Albert Bartlett - Arithmetic, Population and Energy

Arithmetic, Population and Energy -- a talk by Dr. Albert Bartlett on the impossibility of exponential growth on a finite planet.

Professor Al Bartlett begins his one-hour talk with the statement, "The greatest shortcoming of the human race is our inability to understand the exponential function."

He then gives a basic introduction to the arithmetic of steady growth, including an explanation of the concept of doubling time. He explains the impact of unending steady growth on the population of Boulder, of Colorado, and of the world. He then examines the consequences steady growth in a finite environment and observes this growth as applied to fossil fuel consumption, the lifetimes of which are much shorter than the optimistic figures most often quoted.

He proceeds to examine oddly reassuring statements from "experts", the media and political leaders - statements that are dramatically inconsistent with the facts. He discusses the widespread worship of economic growth and population growth in western society. Professor Bartlett explains "sustainability" in the context of the First Law of Sustainability:

"You cannot sustain population growth and / or growth in the rates of consumption of resources.

The talk brings the listener to understand and appreciate the implications of unending growth on a finite planet, and closes noting the crucial need for education topic.

Albert Bartlett's Interview

Albert Bartlett worked with mass spectrometers at Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project. He was part of the group that photographed the Operations Crossroads nuclear tests in the Bikini Atoll after the war. In this interview, he recalls his time at Los Alamos and his colleagues, including Harry Daghlian and Louis Slotin, who would both die of criticality accidents. He discusses the significance of the colloquia that allowed scientists to share their research on the project. He also recalls funs time including skiing on Sawyer’s Hill, hiking, and dorm parties that used scientific materials to make the punch.

Quellen:
http://www.albartlett.org/
http://www.albartlett.org/info/related_websites.html
http://www.colorado.edu/asmagazine/2016/12/06/physics-profs-home-man-himself-now-icon